Mentor Feedback

I thoroughly enjoyed working with and being challenged by Matt Sears, he recognized that I had a little PBL experience coming into the classroom and worked with me as I tried to hone those skills.  Mr. Sears set up a ‘Feedback Form’ in Google Docs that allowed him to post thoughts as I was teaching that were immediately available for me to review and comment on.  He stuck with the ‘Critical Friends’ protocol which meant that after listing what I did that day he had two columns of comments:  what he ‘liked’ and what he ‘wondered’ about.  In general his comments were aimed at the subtleties of content delivery and student engagement and were of great help to me.  I’ve selected some of these bulleted points and listed them (verbatim) in the table below:

 

 

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Mr. Rowe did ____________ I liked ___________ I wonder ___________

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Walked students through practice worksheet on slope and plotting data. Then checked homework on similar worksheet -Calling on girls and boys
-Great worksheet design
-Threw in “rap” references
-Using the phrase, “this should be review from Algebra 1”. How do you think students who are lost or are struggling might feel?
-You said, “you don’t want to end up at McDonalds”. What if a student’s parents work there? How might they feel? Could you consider, when making points like that, saying that if you end up at McDonalds that’s cool, but I want you to have the choice. If you choose McDonalds, I support that.
-Is the class too large for “whole class” discussions?

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Presented a worksheet similar to the homework, then walked students through the homework. -You moved well about the room. I was looking to see if you excluded specific groups with your body language/movement and couldn’t discern any.
-By having the extra activity first, you gave students who DID NOT do their homework to still learn material
-Seemed like all students were engaged
-Good use of technology to enhance instruction (used tablet to show work on the overhead)
-Did you know if students were actually plotting points and completing the work? I wasn’t sure you were actually checking student work…
-One student was seated with their back turned to the board. Could you have asked students to readjust so that everyone could easily see?

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Made a presentation on % change and how it realtes to our project. Mr. Rowe used the overhead to take students through a few examples. -referred back to worksheets from the past (prior knowledge/work)
-you made mistakes (intentionally?) and talked about them with the students
-you made a clear effort to wake up the class and get them thinking
Little things:
-You put up just 2 problems at first. Could you put up more so that kids that get it quickly could work ahead? You could certainly still say, “just do 1 and 2”
-Did you/we mention that calculators would be required? Stopping to let them collect them slowed your progress in my opinion.Bigger things:
Communication: I wonder if we’re communicating effectively? I was hopeful that you would create a full similar situation that was coherent to a problem. I thought you would present a set of data and convert it into % change data that we could plot. Let me know where YOU think the communication broke down and what I can do to better communicate.

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Explained the crux of the Fuel Economy project and how to make predictions from equations that fit data. *Data was ready and was displayed well on overhead
*Graphs were very clear and easy to understand, colorful
*Calculator emulator helped students SEE how to do it.
*None really…I wonder how long it took to create the activity? Is this too time intensive to do on a regular basis???

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* Created a review sheet for regression/%-change
* Walked students through the boxed sections of the study guide
* Engaged students after an hour of quiet work by asking how they were
* Emphasized practice
* What do you think students thought about you mentioning our degrees? I know I do it too, but I often wonder what they think.

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Saw:
*Mr. Rowe had students create Edmodo accounts
*Students read Entry Doc
*Mr. Rowe had student write down 1 Know/Need to Know on Post it
*Students read Entry Documents out loud
*Showed commercials on board
*Discussion on what people saw on the commercials
*Tried to move to Consumer Reports assignment (technical difficulties)
*Group contracts
* Poll question in Edmodo
* Students posting comments in Edmodo…Mr. Rowe contributing
* Having know/need to know on post it shows you when groups are done
* Students had to pick up where the last student left off in reading the Entry Document
* Addressed one of my “I Wonders” now by calling on the other side of the room.
* 5 Groups were seated at the opposite ends of the tables until 10:10am. Could you have said something or done a collaborative activity earlier on?
* Mispronouncing names? Thoughts?
* Energy seemed low during Know/Need to Know. Did writing down just one know/need to know minimize the participation? Why not have them work collaboratively on one sheet to list all knows/need to knows?
* Class is more than 1/2 over…I think this has to do with setting up Edmodo, but time may be an issue. Thoughts?
* During your discussion, most students engaged, but I count 7 that are doing things on the computers
* Classroom conversation is casual, and you’re getting good response, but there are at least 1/2 of students that are not participating. How will you reach these students? Could you engage them more?
* You asked me what we should do next. CAREFUL! 🙂 You want this class to buy in to you as teacher and me as watcher…
* Link not being posted earlier…how does this look to students?
* Obviously the technology got in your way today…what could you do next time? (it got in my way too)

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* Used Edmodo to link to 2 surveys students needed to complete
* Had students do a reflection on an Einstein quote regarding instructional practices
* Lesson using basketball data to calculate total points scored over a year
* Great quote…we followed up on your expectations there so no need to comment
* You were flexible on the homework…you’re leaving the content grade to a later date
* Once the lesson on matrix mult was started, you have a good flow/pace to your work
* 100% HW completion
* Regarding the homework: although you were flexible, how will you address the inevitable situation of: “I lost it since then.”?
* How is Edmodo going? Is it getting in your way at all (in terms of meeting the expected pace of this project?)
* I see you’re doing instruction on Edmodo through the class…could you design some work they could do outside of class that could teach some of this and save you time?
* You still have groups that haven’t REALLY spoken (from what I’ve seen): Aidan-Katerina, Desman-Guadalupe
* Might having a written “to do” plan help you stay organized/on track during your implementation of the day? It is true that I don’t use one, and probably have gaffes as well, but there are times when disorganization slows you down. Example: getting the HW assignment to them. During class you wrote it on a note, then took the note to the board, then wrote it there.
* I’m glad there was 100% HW completion, but could you have mentioned again the group contract firing procedure? I met with the groups yesterday (yes, I had more time) to remind them.
* There was significant assumption of Basketball knowledge in your lesson. I’m sure I did some of this too, but I am always fearful that I will alienate some students and make them feel “uncool” by making it seems like everyone should know this stuff. I make it an explicit point of saying “the National Basketball Association” or other acronyms so students can understand quickly what we’re talking about.
* Should students have been taking notes? It wasn’t until you assigned them to find the total points that someone finally asked, “should we write this down?” and you said “yes.” Although you had strong % of students following you, there wasn’t much kinetic activity in the room which can bring on drowsiness.

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* Review Rubric
* Review FOIL
* Teach Factoring
* Ran out of time to give quiz…
– Explaining rubric
– Video (I’ve linked it on the site)
– The “old fashioned” way of multiplying binomials.
– FYI: Broderick prefers to be called “Mr. Garner”. He is very engaged today…
– Nearly 100% engagement…
– Good movement
– Box method
– Students using the overhead pad
– The “headphones” method…kids are very engaged.
– Moved Tamyrra to help folks concentrate
– Using your notes to put problems on the board…shows that you’re prepared…avoids making up “bad problems”
– Step up to get your rep up
– (side note) Are we going to have them do any reflection? Maybe independently?
– Why did you read the rubric as opposed to someone else?
– There’s a lot of you explaining, which isn’t necessarily bad, but if I’m a student that gets bored…
– Desman and Eric not taking notes. Does this matter to you?
– You’re moving well…but are you monitoring for understanding and working?
– Can you save these notes and send them digitally to Aidan’s mother? Or the rest of the class?
– Discussing mistake of Andrea’s (-21n + 20n): What other ways can you talk about adding/subtracting negatives? I’m sure you know a bunch of ways, but one of my favorites is negative means “owe” and positive means “have” and think about it in terms of $
– Garner eating in class…I’d prefer it if students didn’t (ants) (you addressed this…thanks)
– Explaining pulling x out of 2x^2 + 3x to Jose. It might help to show 2x^2 as 2*x*x + 3*x to visualize it. (later on now)…explaining to Desman. I think it may help all if more prime factorization was involved.
– Please watch the following groups of people as they are exhibiting some negative behaviors: Brown-Perez-Glanton Persaud-Hicklen-Stone

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Same as 11/02 with more videos… * Good-natured Duke/UNC talk
* When it was time for lunch, you had students say “wait” meaning they were very, very engaged. This is a great sign.
* There is some appropriate jockying with students, however, consider that you don’t know what is going on with them outside of class. While they may be in good spirits visibly, deep down they may be hurting and we don’t want to push them over the edge. For instance, there is a student in this class whose mother died a month ago…
* You basically TOLD them the entry document…in general I hate this. I always fall back to: am I working, or are the kids working?
* I wonder if you know these students names. Unique was joking around too much (in my opinion), but he wasn’t called out until after lunch.
* Caution: I think you’d agree that there was rowdiness after lunch that was in some ways detrimental to your goals. This arises from your casualness with them, but your casualness is an asset in some instances. I’m okay with you going down this path, and I’m going to stay hands-off, but I think this could come back to bite you in the same way the “it’s because you’re black” comment did. Some things I would caution you against, “Afro in the way.” Are you sure he’s comfortable with that statement? Yelling, “eh”? Could you find another way, a “trigger” that let’s the class know it’s time to focus? I have some ideas if you like them (classroom management 101)
* I thought there was way too much down time after coming back from lunch. Yes, they started to ask you questions, but that was from minutes 4-8 after class had already started. These kids are proud that they reported back on time, let’s reward them by engaging them immediately, or you may find that getting them back on time is an issue. Just my thoughts.

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* got students working on looking up solar cooker
* Gateway quiz #2
* Graded papers, had failures move to front.
* Selecting groups in the back while running factoring workshop in the front.
* Students working in the front while Mr. Rowe demonstrates focus of light in the back.
* Class was working very quickly
* You weren’t afraid to hold Kayla accountable for asking for help
* You corrected Andrea and Kayla in terms of where they should sit and what they should be doing.
* Once the followup workshop got started, I liked the breaking down of the terms into prime factors
* Good division into two working groups
* Students are using your overhead projector while you’re demonstrating the light/parabola in the back
*Just saying, “explain in plain English…” We’ll see if that’s enough for them to meet your objectives.
*Again, I’m very worried that we assume to much with students factoring x out of x^2 without the intermediate step of x^2 = x*x…we’ll see…
*You knew this was coming: “If you CAN’T pass this…” Careful.
* Would a “conversation in the hall” be a way to help Kayla better understand your expectations? Maybe we need to do a behavior contract with her?
* Jose just got a computer to get started…why was he putting it back?
* Spending a lot of time moving students around for the workshop…visually you look frustrated. A lot of down time here for students in the front. If they’re behind (and they are), should they get your full attention?
* For the written work in the back, might it have helped you stay more organized to do a Google Form and have emailed it to them for the writing piece? I heard you tell them to type it.
* Now I’m being picky (but Ginny mentioned vocab): Is 1 a prime #? I’d like to hear the word “composite” here. Numbers are prime or composite, no? It’s not super important that we get this in, but this lesson is an opportunity to inject more formal math language.
* Desman was naming students: “Desmond, that-dude-right-there, Mohammad…” I wonder if you should have called him on that. To not know a fellow student’s name on 11/8 is weird and without correcting him, I worry that that student (Isaiah) feels like he doesn’t matter to Desman or teacher. Knitpicky…but…
* It seems like a bit of a struggle to both run the workshop effectively and get the group selections going in the back. Is there a way that the people in the back could be truly independent so you can focus on the front???
* Why not do GCF of a trinomial? Negatives?
* Do you think those that have not passed the Gateway understand that by continued failure they are putting themselves further and further behind???

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* Too much time with helping??? It’s 15 minutes into class and you’ve not begun the quiz. You’re doing what you had hoped would happen at lunch/after school. I think we need to think really hard about this: THEY’RE NOT DOING WHAT YOU WANT. You do keep repeating when you’re available, BUT repeating it and then throwing up our hands and saying to ourselves, “I tried…” isn’t enough. Private conversations need to start happening (hallway, lunch, etc.). Parent phone calls need to start happening. You going to the lunch room needs to start happening where you make eye contact and signal them to come to you. We need to think about the maturity level here…if given a choice, nearly all kids will choose to play around during lunch instead of working. I’m thinking about Unique, Cairo, Thomas, Justin B, Romario, Isaiah. I think they need to see you more as invested in them. Please reflect on this and let me know your thoughts.

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* Gateway quiz
* Remediation
* You pulled the students in the back out in the hall to talk to them
* You’ve repeated several times your expectations for them seeing you
* What resources do you need in the room such that you are doing the “lunch tutoring” in here? Why not do your tutoring in the lunch room where students are more likely to see you and remember?
* How will these students (those that haven’t passed the gateway) finish the project by Thanksgiving? Have you considered shutting the other groups down and having them do some reciprocal tutoring so that they can learn? And have multiple attempts in the same class period??? This is the 4th direct instruction with this group of students…
* You really are keeping your body on the left side of the board when you break in teaching. Consider moving to the right more than you’re doing…

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* Served as substitute while I was out
* Continued implementing parabola project
* Final report submitted for the three days was unprompted
* I did not get any emails from students or parents reporting problems
* Other teachers confirmed that things were fine while I was out
* NC Wise attendance was not done on Wednesday
* Report of how the day went should be emailed daily, for instance, had I known that Jarad was a problem on Monday, I could have remotely addressed in an saved poor behavior on Wednesday that will now result in discipline that adds more work to all involved
* What is happening in Algebra 2? The Agendas on the Calendar have not been updated since Wed 10/10? No updates for the website have been sent. Not only is it a problem that I’m not up to date on what is happening in Algebra 2, but any parents and Dr. Logan are in the dark as well. While I know you’re not trying to hide anything, it doesn’t look good.
* Grades: progress reports will be issued Monday and there are only 5 grades that only span 2 Learning Outcomes. Parents (rightly so) are going to ask what these assignments are and what their kids have been doing. Related: get into the habit of using the “description” box in Engrade to explain what assignments are and consider more understandable titles

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* Casual workshop on finding focus from a parabola (including measuring and regression)
* Impromptu formal workshop on cross multiplication
* Put class to work, directions on board
* You have an ally in Mr. Garner-really engaged, showing leadership, doing good work. This shows me strong relationship development and that he is a student that likes your teaching style.
* Good implementation of PBL by calling the impromptu workshop.
* I assume you took Jose out into the hall to talk with him about strategies
* What about kids that don’t like your teaching style?
* What strategies did you give Jose for working with Aidan? How do you plan to incorporate Mr. Anderson? Will you update Dr. and Mr. Hennessy?
* Online agendas? Materials list in digital form? Kids should be able to find what they need to know….

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Homework, Classwork, and Assessments

The homework, classwork, and assessments contain a large number of algebraic expressions, charts, and graphs that cannot be formatted properly for display on this website, therefor I have converted them to a PDF file that can be downloaded/viewed by clicking on the link below.  As noted in the file, in addition to these ‘traditional’ assessments, there will also be a group report and group presentation component.

Homework, Classwork, and Assesments

Detailed Daily Lesson Plans

As indicated in the daily lesson outline section, the lessons in this unit need to be able to expand and contract as needed.  Therefore, one may cover two of these lesson plans in one day, or split one lesson up into several days as needed.

 

Lesson step

Description of Activities and Setting

Question script

1. Focus/hook and review


(First day of school)

Building up context for the project by discussing/researching the concept of fuel economy.

 

What is meant by fuel economy?  What does MPG mean?

2. Statement of Objective


Given an article and access to materials (online or traditional) explain fuel economy, MPG, and what can be done to improve these things
3. Instructional Sequence

A. Teacher input

 

 

B. Guided Practice

 

 

 

C. Independent practice

Activity #1-Teacher Input

What is ‘fuel economy’?

Hand out CAFE standards legislation article.

Activity #2-Guided Practice

Students come up with
lists of questions they have and we discuss them as a group.


Activity #3-Independent Practice

Students split into
pre-assigned groups of 3-4, and research these topics.

 

6. Closure and/or Evaluation


Collect fuel economy worksheets.

Preview tomorrow by asking students to think about what they want their group contract to include.

What do we remember about organizing data? (List terms they remember, formulas, etc…)

Lesson Essential questions:

  1. What is fuel economy?
  2. What does MPG stand for?
  3. What do we know about the project?

 

Lesson materials/reference list:

  1. Fuel economy article
  2. Internet access or printed materials

 

Lesson step

Description of Activities and Setting

Question script

1. Focus/hook and review
Opening group work discussion
(Question Script)
 

What do you feel are your
strengths? weaknesses?

2. Statement of Objective


Given raw data the student
creates an organized chart, table, or graph that is labeled 80% correctly.
3. Instructional Sequence

A. Teacher input

 

 

B. Guided Practice

 

 

 

C. Independent practice

Activity #1-Teacher Input

Define group roles: Leader, secretary, clerk, etc…

Hand out entry document.

Activity #2-Guided Practice

Students come up with
knows/need to knows from entry document. I list them on the board.

Given the entry document
the students will list what the know and what they
need to know about the projects.
Activity #3-Independent Practice

Students split into
pre-assigned groups of 3-4, using strengths/weaknesses come up with group
roles and fill out group contract.

 

6. Closure and/or Evaluation


Collect group contracts.

Preview tomorrow by asking
students what they remember about charts and tables.

What do we remember about organizing data? (List terms they remember, formulas, etc…)

Lesson Essential questions:

  1. What can we bring to a group?
  2. What are the different roles in a group?
  3. What do we know about the project?
  4. What do we need to know about the project to finish it?

 

Lesson materials/reference list:

  1. Entry document
  2. Group contracts

Lesson step Description of Activities and Setting Question script
1. Focus/hook and review
Have knows/need to knows up on the board when students enter the room. Have data presentation ‘need to
knows’ highlighted.
What ways can we organize
data?
2. Statement of Objective
Given raw data the student
creates an organized chart, table, or graph that is labeled 90% correctly.
3. Instructional Sequence

A. Teacher input

B. Guided Practice

 

 

 

 

 

C. Independent practice

 

 

Activity #1-Teacher Input

Look at unorganized sample
data, show it organized in different manners.

Activity #2-Guided Practice

Hand out sample data sheets, students organize data into tables, charts, and
graphs. I show my answers on the
board.

Given data the students
should be able to organize and arrange it graphically.
Activity #3-Independent Practice

Students split into groups
and begin collecting data from experimental set-up.

 

6. Closure and/or Evaluation
Collect group contracts.

Preview tomorrow by asking
students what they remember about lines.

What do we remember about lines? (List terms they remember, formulas, etc…)

Lesson Essential questions:

  1. How can we organize data in useful ways?
  2. How can we use technology to help us organize data?

 

Lesson materials/reference list:

  1. Sample data class work sheet.
  2. Sample data homework sheet.

 

Lesson step Description of Activities and Setting Question script
1. Focus/hook and review
Have sample data warm-up on
board.
Given this data, can you
organize it into a table and graph?
2. Statement of Objective
Given raw real world data
the student uses technological devices (computer, graphing calculator) to
organize the information 90% of labels are correct and 90% of data is entered
correctly.
3. Instructional Sequence

A. Teacher input

B. Guided Practice

 

 

 

 

 

C. Independent practice

 

 

Activity #1-Teacher Input

Answer any questions from
group leaders concerning data collection using the experimental set-up.

Activity #2-Guided Practice

The students finish collecting
data using the experimental set-up.

Given data the students
should be able to organize and arrange it graphically.
Activity #3-Independent Practice

Group leaders assign tasks
to group members such as materials research and make sure the data is entered
into their computer.

 

6. Closure and/or Evaluation
Leaders email me data
collection tables.
Remind students about slope
and slope-intercept form.
How are we going to use this data?

Lesson Essential questions:

  1. How can we organize data in useful ways?
  2. How can we use technology to help us organize data?

 

Lesson materials/reference list:

  1. Collected data emailed to instructor.

 

Lesson step Description
of Activities and Setting
Question
script
1. Focus/hook and review
Have sample data projected
on board, have students enter the data into a spreadsheet.
Given this data, can you
create a spreadsheet on the computer?
2. Statement of Objective
Given a data set the
student computes linear equations and lines of best fit so that no data
points are more than 10% away from derived line.
3. Instructional Sequence

A. Teacher input

 

 

 

 

 

B. Guided Practice

 

C. Independent practice

 

Activity #1-Teacher Input

I will demonstrate how to
use a spreadsheet to calculate a line of best fit and display the equation.

Activity #2-Guided Practice

Students follow along on
their computers while we step through creating lines of best fit.

Given data can you create a line of best fit on the spreadsheet?
Activity #3-Independent Practice

Students split into their
groups and continue working on their final product.

 

6. Closure and/or Evaluation) Collect updated task lists from group
leaders; they should have remaining tasks assigned.
 

What kind of a relation
does your data have?

Lesson Essential questions:

  1. How do we create linear equations from our collected data?

Lesson materials/reference list:

  1. Interpreting slope worksheet.

 

Lesson step Description
of Activities and Setting
Question
script
1. Focus/hook and review
Have the following question
on the board:
“How much fuel would you
have to save to justify the greater cost of the light weight materials?”
How much fuel would you
have to save to justify the greater cost of the light
weight materials?
2. Statement of Objective
Given linear equations the
students are able to derive information and apply their results to unknowns. Propagated data should be 80%
accurate.
3. Instructional Sequence

A. Teacher input

 

B. Guided Practice

 

 

 

 

 

C. Independent practice

 

 

Activity #1-Teacher Input

How would we calculate our
potential savings? (Minimum input as this is the last work day for the project.)

Activity #2-Guided Practice

Group leaders will have a
chance to ask questions individually.

Given the lessons of this
unit can the students include this new aspect in their reports?
Activity #3-Independent Practice

Students split into their
groups and put the finishing touches on their projects.

 

6. Closure and/or Evaluation
Collect preliminary reports
from the students.
Tomorrow is presentation day!

Lesson Essential questions:

  1. Do the savings in fuel cost justify the use of more expensive
    material?

NC Standard Course of Study Objectives

NC Algebra I
Competency Goal 1 The learner will perform operations with numbers and expressions to solve problems.

1.02 Use formulas and algebraic expressions, including iterative and recursive forms, to model and solve problems.

1.03 Model and solve problems using direct variation

Competency Goal 3 The learner will collect, organize, and interpret data with matrices and linear models to solve problems.

3.01 Use matrices to display and interpret data.

3.03 Create linear models for sets of data to solve problems.

1. Interpret constants and coefficients in the context of the data.

2. Check the model for goodness-of-fit and use the model, where appropriate, to draw conclusions or make predictions

Competency Goal 4 The learner will use relations and functions to solve problems.

4.01 Use linear functions or inequalities to model and solve problems; justify results.

1. Solve using tables, graphs, and algebraic properties.

2. Interpret constants and coefficients in the context of the problem.

4.03 Use systems of linear equations or inequalities in two variables to model and solve problems. Solve using tables, graphs, and algebraic properties; justify results.

4.04 Graph and evaluate exponential functions to solve problems.

NC Earth/Environmental Science
Competency Goal 1: The learner will develop abilities necessary to do and understand scientific inquiry in the earth and environmental sciences.

1.02 Design and conduct scientific investigations to answer questions related to earth and environmental science.

* Create testable hypotheses

* Identify variables.

* Use a control or comparison group when appropriate.

* Select and use appropriate measurement tools.

* Collect and record data.

* Organize data into charts and graphs.

* Analyze and interpret data.

* Communicate findings.

1.04 Apply safety procedures in the laboratory and in field studies:

* Recognize and avoid potential hazards.

* Safely manipulate materials and equipment needed for scientific investigations.

1.05 Analyze reports of scientific investigations and environmental issues from an informed scientifically literate viewpoint including considerations of:

* Appropriate sample.

* Adequacy of experimental controls.

* Replication of findings.

* Alternative interpretations of the data.

1.06 Identify and evaluate a range of possible solutions to earth and environmental issues at the local, national, and global level including considerations of:

* Interdependent human and natural systems.

* Diverse perspectives.

* Short and long range impacts.

* Economic development, environmental quality and sustainability.

* Opportunities for and consequences of personal decisions.

* Risks and benefits of technological advances.

Daily Lesson Outline

The Project/Inquiry Based Learning approach requires more flexibility than the traditional teaching model.  Depending on how the unit progresses the length of this project may contract by a day or two or may expand by up to five.  If this unit were to run longer than scheduled I would make sure at least one other objective from the SCOS gets injected into the project process to compensate.  I have never seen negative consequences from a unit running long, generally this is an indication that the students have started to delve deeper than originally intended.  In the case of this project, which is intended to be the students’ first, running long tends to mean that they are getting adjusted to the project process.  Allowing them ‘wiggle’ room on this, their first unit, generally pays off in the long run.

 

Day(s) Lesson Focus:

i.  Topics

ii.  Essential Question

SCOS objective:

 

Bloom’s
taxonomy
Instructional strategies
and modalities:
A-Auditory, V-Visual, K-Kinesthetic
Assessment: Check for
Understanding
1
  1. What is meant by ‘fuel economy’?
  2. Do students have an understanding of what is meant by the phrase ‘fuel economy’?
3.01

4.01

Knowledge

Comprehension

Analysis

 

A- lecture followed by a class/group discussion

V-notes will be on projector and computer screens

K– class will be researching topic with computers and other media

Summary of article on CAFE laws
 

Socratic method style questioning

2
  1. Organizing data
  2. Given unorganized, separate pieces of
    data can students put them in a useable format?
3.01

4.01

Knowledge

Comprehension

Analysis

 

A- lecture on interpreting dataV-notes will be on projector and computer screens

K– class will be doing examples and following along on handouts

Classwork handout

Homework handout

 

 

Directed
questioning

3
  1. Collect data
  2. Given real world data can the students
    organize and present it in a usable way?
3.01

3.03

Application

 

A- lecture on lab setupV-notes will be on projector and computer screens

K – class will be collecting data

Collected
data table
4
  1. Organize data
  2. Given data can the students use of
    spreadsheets to organize it?
3.01

4.01

Application

Analysis

Synthesis

A- lecture on lab setupV-notes will be on projector and computer screens

K– class will be collecting data

Final
data collection table
5
  1. Using real world data
  2. What are ways that we create and organize data in day to day life (often without realizing it)?
1.02

1.03

3.03

4.01

4.03

4.04

Knowledge

Comprehension

Application

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation

A- Socratic questioning on topics such as paychecks, ordering online, utility bills, etc…

V-notes will be on projector and computer screens

K– Drawing diagrams on graph paper

Graph paper

List of basic problems

 

 

 

 

 

 

6
  1. Creating a line of best fit
  2. Given organized data can the students
    calculate the line of best fit?
1.02

1.03

3.03

4.01

4.03

4.04

Knowledge

Comprehension

Application

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation

A- lecture on line of best fit

V-notes will be on projector and computer screens

K– Interpreting slope handout/worksheet

Interpreting
slope worksheet
 

 

 

 

 

7
  1. Analyze fuel savings.
  2. Given data and linear equations can the
    students interpret the results effectively?
1.02

1.03

3.03

4.01

4.03

4.04

Knowledge

Comprehension

Application

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation

A– introduce project “twist” documentV-notes will be on projector and computer screens

K– Using computers to model data

Interpreting
slope handout/worksheet
 

Data
Interpretation Quiz

8
  1. Finish project.
  2. Is the project ready for presentation
    to outside judges?
1.02

1.03

3.03

4.01

4.03

4.04

Knowledge

Comprehension

Application

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation

A– groups will present to/critique each otherV-groups will use visual aids

K– groups will critique one another and make notes for improvement

Project
reports
9
  1. Presentations
  2. Can the students take everything
    they’ve learned and present it in a cohesive, effective manner??
1.02

1.03

3.03

4.01

4.03

4.04

Knowledge

Comprehension

Application

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation

A,V,K-Groups
will be presenting their projects to outside judges
Presentations
10
  1. Unit Test
  2. Given all the lessons have the
    students learned enough to pass a standard, traditional test?
1.02

1.03

3.03

4.01

4.03

4.04

Knowledge

Comprehension

Application

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation

A,V,K-Individuals
will be taking the unit tests
Unit
Test

 

Sample Unit

This project is designed to take place during the first two weeks of an Algebra I class, traditionally with High School freshman. In it they collect data, organize it, and make predictions using their data. This project looks at how lighter weight materials could impact fuel economy in cars. I have included cross-curricular objectives from NC’s Earth Science Standard Course of Study; also traditionally taught to High School freshman. I have adapted this project for Algebra II, and I feel it could be adapted to higher level sciences as well. As it is moved up in levels the project becomes more sophisticated, using curves of best fit instead of lines and looking at cost and environmental impact of proposed materials.

Unit Essential Question:
Will the use of lighter weight materials in automobile production have a significant impact on fuel economy?

 

Lesson Questions:
  • How do we take unorganized, separate pieces of data and put them in a useable format?
  • How do we use what we’ve learned from data collection in a real world setting?
  • How do we organize and use real world data?
  • How do we create linear equations from data?
  • Is the cost of lighter weight materials worth the fuel savings?

Reason for unit:

Every pre-requisite for Algebra I will be covered along with new information about relations found in data and practice modeling real world data using linear equations.

Relevance:

This unit is relevant as it is related to the current “green” movement, these particular parts were chosen because they serve as a quick reminder of all the math that was covered leading up to this point.

Challenges:

The biggest challenge faced will be adjusting the students.  This unit will be introduced on their first day in High School.  For most this will be their first introduction to a true group oriented, project based learning approach.

Unit Content:

For their first project the students will be investigating the impact that weight reduction will have on fuel economy in cars.  Through the course of this unit they will be taking data, learning about relative relations, creating linear equations based on data points, and coming up with recommendations based upon their findings.